• Tasha Page

The Principle of the Path

Updated: Jan 22

Writing a book is nerve-wracking. In some ways, it can be compared to having a child. Something has been created from what seems like nothing. You gestate it for a season, then launch it out into the world. Once the world possesses it, you have less control over its destination. It is in God‘s hands. The prospect of being vulnerable with the world is terrifying, but that is the path I felt like He was leading me down. It all started with various individuals planting the seed suggesting that I write a book. After enough instances, it caught my attention that maybe it was God whispering to me through other people. I prayed heavily about it, and the decision felt right. But I had no idea what I was supposed to start writing. So I made a deal with God. If He gave me the words each day, I would write down what I heard. Most mornings I would get up at 4 am, spend devotional time with God, and then try to get in at least ninety minutes of writing time before I had to get the boys ready for school. One hundred and four days later, “We’re All Doing Our Best '' was done. It’s being edited right now, which feels like the end of the third trimester of pregnancy. I’m currently in labor, having contractions, and waiting to give birth.


Do I like getting up at 4 in the morning? Not at all. But my mind is the sharpest in the morning, and there are fewer distractions. It’s one of the few times of day I can concentrate without being interrupted. That was the path I needed to take to achieve the goal I felt God called me to accomplish. I had to sacrifice evenings doing what I wanted (reading more books) so that I could go to bed early and get more sleep. God put the passion in my heart to overcome this challenging feat. Passion is what you are willing to suffer for. There were plenty of mornings that writing felt like suffering, trust me. That was the price I needed to pay, to reap the rewards of hard work sown.


I recently finished reading "The Principle of the Path'' by Andy Stanley. It is an excellent read, especially if you wake up daily and ask yourself why your life isn't like you dreamed it would be. It should be on the curriculum for every high schooler about to be launched out of the protective cushion of the parental nest. One of the things Andy said that stuck with me most was: "Direction - not intention - determines our destination.” Pg. 14. Each and every action we take sets us on a path that will eventually lead to a destination. More often than not, I find myself starting projects, but then something else gets my attention, and I stray off course. My intentions were good. Yet, I suffer from shiny ball syndrome, and my attention is prone to wander. The decision to focus on other things takes me off my intended track, and I end up off course. Better yet, I have a challenging time remembering to ask God what path I should be on in the first place. As a Christian, that is the most crucial question we all need to ask ourselves: "Does this track lead towards Christ?”


So I ask you now, are the choices you are making taking you down the path you intend? Or do you need to surrender your internal compass to the one who holds the map? We often let our hearts lead us, but they are bad tour guides. “The heart is deceitful above all things, and desperately sick; who can understand it?” Jeremiah 17:9. Our quest for happiness often leads us astray, and we find ourselves grieving our dying dreams. That leads to a rocky path lined with bitterness and resentment. So let us let Christ determine our direction. “Let us lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith” Hebrews 12:1-2.


Have a fantastic week, and Godspeed on whatever path you decide to take. Stay tuned because I will be announcing the book release date for my first book: "We're All Doing Our Best" in the very near future!


Shalom




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